Financial attitudes and behaviour tracker

ASIC's Australian Financial Attitudes and Behaviour Tracker

The Australian Financial Attitudes and Behaviour Tracker provides a snapshot at regular intervals of some key financial attitudes and behaviours of adult Australians.

The Tracker is an important initiative under the 2014 Strategy, led and coordinated by ASIC.

The research was conducted for the first time in August 2014.

Why track Australians' attitudes and behaviours?

Financial decision-making is complex and contextual. Prior research undertaken suggests that a wide range of shifting factors can have an impact on decisions and outcomes, including people's life stage and past experiences, psychological, social and cultural factors, and other external environmental circumstances.

ASIC has developed the Australian Financial Attitudes and Behaviour Tracker to help track a number of financial attitudes and behaviours among adult Australians and inform financial literacy programs and initiatives.

Findings from the Tracker will supplement other research in the field, including the well-established ANZ Survey of Adult Financial Literacy in Australia, which has been the leading reference point for measuring population-wide financial literacy levels in Australia since 2003.

Research purpose

The Tracker aims to:

  • Track changes and trends in some key financial attitudes and behaviours at regular intervals to build up a picture of changes and trends over time
  • Inform and support ASIC's priority to promote investor and financial consumer trust and confidence
  • Inform broader research, measurement and evaluation of Australians' financial literacy levels and wellbeing.

Research framework

The research is framed around the five indicative behaviours of financial literacy identified in the 2011 ANZ Survey of Adult Financial Literacy in Australia and the 2014 Strategy, detailed below. In addition, it explores a number of attitudinal measures.

Five indicative behaviours of financial literacy:

  • Keeping track of finances: approaches to managing everyday expenses
  • Planning ahead: planning for the medium and longer term, including retirement and beyond
  • Choosing financial products: shopping around, and understanding and assessing investment risk
  • Staying informed: use of information, tools and guidance when needed
  • Financial control: savings behaviour and managing debts.

Key findings from Wave 4: September 2015 to February 2016

This report contains the findings about some key financial attitudes and behaviours of Australians over the six month period from September 2015 to February 2016. The research was undertaken by EY Sweeney on behalf of ASIC.

Read the Australian Financial Attitudes and Behaviour Tracker: Wave 4, Key Findings.

Key findings from Wave 3: March 2015 to August 2015

This report contains the findings about some key financial attitudes and behaviours of Australians over the six month period from March to August 2015. The research was undertaken by EY Sweeney on behalf of ASIC.

Read the Australian Financial Attitudes and Behaviour Tracker: Wave 3, Key Findings.

Key findings from Wave 2: September 2014 to February 2015

This report contains the findings about some key financial attitudes and behaviours of Australians over the six month period from September 2014 to February 2015. The research was undertaken by EY Sweeney Research on behalf of ASIC.

Read the Australian Financial Attitudes and Behaviour Tracker: Wave 2, Key Findings.

Key findings from Wave 1: March 2014 to August 2014

This report contains the benchmark findings about some key financial attitudes and behaviours of Australians over the six month period from March to August 2014. The research was undertaken by Sweeney Research on behalf of ASIC.

Read the Australian Financial Attitudes and Behaviour Tracker: Wave 1, Key Findings.

The Tracker will be repeated at regular intervals. Future waves of research will track attitudes and behaviours over time to identify trends and highlight changes.


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Last updated: 22 Jun 2016